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The Inferno, Canto 15, lines 28-29: “Sir! Brunetto! And art thou here?”

by Gustave Dore

The Inferno, Canto 15, lines 28-29: “Sir! Brunetto! And art thou here?” - Gustave Dore
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The Inferno, Canto 15, lines 28-29: “Sir! Brunetto! And art thou here?” - Gustave Dore

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Description
English: "The Inferno, Canto 15, lines 28-29: “Sir! Brunetto! And art thou here?”" oil on Canvas, location: Private collection.
Source

http://www.wikigallery.org/

Author

Gustave Dore

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Location

Private collection

Permission

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Note that a few countries have copyright terms longer than 70 years: Mexico has 100 years, Colombia has 80 years, and Guatemala and Samoa have 75 years. This image may not be in the public domain in these countries, which moreover do not implement the rule of the shorter term. Côte d'Ivoire has a general copyright term of 99 years and Honduras has 75 years, but they do implement that rule of the shorter term.


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Next Paintings

The Inferno, Canto 17, line 117: New terror I conceiv’d at the steep plunge - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 17, line 117: New terror I conceiv’d at the steep plunge - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 18, line 38: Ah! how they made them bound at the first stripe! - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 18, line 38: Ah! how they made them bound at the first stripe! - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 18, lines 116-117: “Why greedily thus bendest more on me, Than on these other filthy ones, thy ken?” - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 18, lines 116-117: “Why greedily thus bendest more on me, Than on these other filthy ones, thy ken?” - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 18, lines 130-132: Thais is this, the harlot, whose false lip Answer’d her doting paramour that ask’d, ‘Thankest me much!’ - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 18, lines 130-132: Thais is this, the harlot, whose false lip Answer’d her doting paramour that ask’d, ‘Thankest me much!’ - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 19, lines 10-11: There stood I like the friar, that doth shrive A wretch for murder doom’d - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 19, lines 10-11: There stood I like the friar, that doth shrive A wretch for murder doom’d - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 21, lines 50-51: This said, They grappled him with more than hundred hooks - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 21, lines 50-51: This said, They grappled him with more than hundred hooks - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 22, line 70: In pursuit He therefore sped, exclaiming; “Thou art caught.” - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 22, line 70: In pursuit He therefore sped, exclaiming; “Thou art caught.” - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 22, lines 137-139: But the’ other prov’d A goshawk able to rend well his foe; And in the boiling lake both fell. - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 22, lines 137-139: But the’ other prov’d A goshawk able to rend well his foe; And in the boiling lake both fell. - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 23, lines 52-54: Scarcely had his feet Reach’d to the lowest of the bed beneath, When over us the steep they reach’d - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 23, lines 52-54: Scarcely had his feet Reach’d to the lowest of the bed beneath, When over us the steep they reach’d - Gustave Dore
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