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The Inferno, Canto 18, lines 116-117: “Why greedily thus bendest more on me, Than on these other filthy ones, thy ken?”

by Gustave Dore

The Inferno, Canto 18, lines 116-117: “Why greedily thus bendest more on me, Than on these other filthy ones, thy ken?” - Gustave Dore
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The Inferno, Canto 18, lines 116-117: “Why greedily thus bendest more on me, Than on these other filthy ones, thy ken?” - Gustave Dore

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Description
English: "The Inferno, Canto 18, lines 116-117: “Why greedily thus bendest more on me, Than on these other filthy ones, thy ken?”" oil on Canvas, location: Private collection.
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Author

Gustave Dore

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Location

Private collection

Permission

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Next Paintings

The Inferno, Canto 18, lines 130-132: Thais is this, the harlot, whose false lip Answer’d her doting paramour that ask’d, ‘Thankest me much!’ - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 18, lines 130-132: Thais is this, the harlot, whose false lip Answer’d her doting paramour that ask’d, ‘Thankest me much!’ - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 19, lines 10-11: There stood I like the friar, that doth shrive A wretch for murder doom’d - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 19, lines 10-11: There stood I like the friar, that doth shrive A wretch for murder doom’d - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 21, lines 50-51: This said, They grappled him with more than hundred hooks - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 21, lines 50-51: This said, They grappled him with more than hundred hooks - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 22, line 70: In pursuit He therefore sped, exclaiming; “Thou art caught.” - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 22, line 70: In pursuit He therefore sped, exclaiming; “Thou art caught.” - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 22, lines 137-139: But the’ other prov’d A goshawk able to rend well his foe; And in the boiling lake both fell. - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 22, lines 137-139: But the’ other prov’d A goshawk able to rend well his foe; And in the boiling lake both fell. - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 23, lines 52-54: Scarcely had his feet Reach’d to the lowest of the bed beneath, When over us the steep they reach’d - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 23, lines 52-54: Scarcely had his feet Reach’d to the lowest of the bed beneath, When over us the steep they reach’d - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 23, lines 92-94: “Tuscan, who visitest The college of the mourning hypocrites, Disdain not to instruct us who thou art.” - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 23, lines 92-94: “Tuscan, who visitest The college of the mourning hypocrites, Disdain not to instruct us who thou art.” - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 24, lines 89-92: Amid this dread exuberance of woe Ran naked spirits wing’d with horrid fear, Nor hope had they of crevice where to hide, Or heliotrope to charm them out of view. - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 24, lines 89-92: Amid this dread exuberance of woe Ran naked spirits wing’d with horrid fear, Nor hope had they of crevice where to hide, Or heliotrope to charm them out of view. - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 25, lines 59-61: The other two Look’d on exclaiming: “Ah, how dost thou change, Agnello!” - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 25, lines 59-61: The other two Look’d on exclaiming: “Ah, how dost thou change, Agnello!” - Gustave Dore
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