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The Inferno, Canto 13, line 120: “Haste now,” the foremost cried, “now haste thee death!”

by Gustave Dore

The Inferno, Canto 13, line 120: “Haste now,” the foremost cried, “now haste thee death!” - Gustave Dore
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The Inferno, Canto 13, line 120: “Haste now,” the foremost cried, “now haste thee death!” - Gustave Dore

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Description
English: "The Inferno, Canto 13, line 120: “Haste now,” the foremost cried, “now haste thee death!”" oil on Canvas, location: Private collection.
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Author

Gustave Dore

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Location

Private collection

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Next Paintings

The Inferno, Canto 13, lines 11: Here the brute Harpies make their nest - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 13, lines 11: Here the brute Harpies make their nest - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 14, line 37-39: Unceasing was the play of wretched hands, Now this, now that way glancing, to shake off The heat, still falling fresh. - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 14, line 37-39: Unceasing was the play of wretched hands, Now this, now that way glancing, to shake off The heat, still falling fresh. - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 15, lines 28-29: “Sir! Brunetto! And art thou here?” - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 15, lines 28-29: “Sir! Brunetto! And art thou here?” - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 17, line 117: New terror I conceiv’d at the steep plunge - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 17, line 117: New terror I conceiv’d at the steep plunge - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 18, line 38: Ah! how they made them bound at the first stripe! - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 18, line 38: Ah! how they made them bound at the first stripe! - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 18, lines 116-117: “Why greedily thus bendest more on me, Than on these other filthy ones, thy ken?” - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 18, lines 116-117: “Why greedily thus bendest more on me, Than on these other filthy ones, thy ken?” - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 18, lines 130-132: Thais is this, the harlot, whose false lip Answer’d her doting paramour that ask’d, ‘Thankest me much!’ - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 18, lines 130-132: Thais is this, the harlot, whose false lip Answer’d her doting paramour that ask’d, ‘Thankest me much!’ - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 19, lines 10-11: There stood I like the friar, that doth shrive A wretch for murder doom’d - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 19, lines 10-11: There stood I like the friar, that doth shrive A wretch for murder doom’d - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 21, lines 50-51: This said, They grappled him with more than hundred hooks - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 21, lines 50-51: This said, They grappled him with more than hundred hooks - Gustave Dore
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