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The Inferno, Canto 34, lines 20-21: “Lo!” he exclaim’d, “lo Dis! and lo the place, Where thou hast need to arm thy heart with strength.”

by Gustave Dore

The Inferno, Canto 34, lines 20-21: “Lo!” he exclaim’d, “lo Dis! and lo the place, Where thou hast need to arm thy heart with strength.” - Gustave Dore
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The Inferno, Canto 34, lines 20-21: “Lo!” he exclaim’d, “lo Dis! and lo the place, Where thou hast need to arm thy heart with strength.” - Gustave Dore

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English: "The Inferno, Canto 34, lines 20-21: “Lo!” he exclaim’d, “lo Dis! and lo the place, Where thou hast need to arm thy heart with strength.”" oil on Canvas, location: Private collection.
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http://www.wikigallery.org/

Author

Gustave Dore

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Location

Private collection

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Next Paintings

The Inferno, Canto 5, lines 105-106: 'Love brought us to one death: Caina waits The soul, who spilt our life.' - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 5, lines 105-106: 'Love brought us to one death: Caina waits The soul, who spilt our life.' - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 5, lines 134-135: 'In its leaves that day We read no more.' - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 5, lines 134-135: 'In its leaves that day We read no more.' - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 5, lines 137-138: I through compassion fainting, seem’d not far From death, and like a corpse fell to the ground. - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 5, lines 137-138: I through compassion fainting, seem’d not far From death, and like a corpse fell to the ground. - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 5, lines 72-74: 'Bard! willingly I would address those two together coming, Which seem so light before the wind.' - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 5, lines 72-74: 'Bard! willingly I would address those two together coming, Which seem so light before the wind.' - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 6, lines 24-26: Then my guide, his palms Expanding on the ground, thence filled with earth Rais’d them, and cast it in his ravenous maw. - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 6, lines 24-26: Then my guide, his palms Expanding on the ground, thence filled with earth Rais’d them, and cast it in his ravenous maw. - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 6, lines 49-52: 'Thy city heap’d with envy to the brim, Ay that the measure overflows its bounds, Held me in brighter days. Ye citizens Were wont to name me Ciacco.' - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 6, lines 49-52: 'Thy city heap’d with envy to the brim, Ay that the measure overflows its bounds, Held me in brighter days. Ye citizens Were wont to name me Ciacco.' - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 7, lines 118-119: “Now seest thou, son! The souls of those, whom anger overcame.” - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 7, lines 118-119: “Now seest thou, son! The souls of those, whom anger overcame.” - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 7, lines 65-67: “Not all the gold, that is beneath the moon, Or ever hath been, of these toil-worn souls Might purchase rest for one.” - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 7, lines 65-67: “Not all the gold, that is beneath the moon, Or ever hath been, of these toil-worn souls Might purchase rest for one.” - Gustave Dore
The Inferno, Canto 7, lines 8-9:
The Inferno, Canto 7, lines 8-9: "Curs’d wolf! thy fury inward on thyself Prey, and consume thee!” - Gustave Dore
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